Brincadeira

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cheapfilling:

college is catered towards the able bodied and able minded. school applauds people who can stay up all night, skip meals, and work endlessly. that kind of extreme contribution is expected. why are disabled people being squeezed out of academic institutions? why should I feel inferior because of some arbitrary and ridiculous standard?

LOL

(via socialjusticejonah)

— 9 months ago with 28151 notes
sagansense:

Momentum Builds For Obama’s BRAIN Initiative 
One of the goals of this collaboration of public and private funds is to better understand the brain’s structure and function.
A new initiative to understand the human brain, announced by President Barack Obama earlier this year, has left people wondering exactly what its goals will be. The project’s leaders sketched out their ideas — and offered a healthy dose of enthusiasm — at a recent meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego.  The BRAIN Initiative (short for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) is a collaborative effort between government agencies, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and private funding organizations. The ambitious project — the details of which are still being worked out — aims to speed development of new technologies for understanding the brain’s structure and function.
The ‘next great American project’ Obama has called the BRAIN Initiative "the next great American project," and indeed, that was the mood among the panel members here. Thomas Insel, director of the NIH’s National Institute of Mental Health, compared the BRAIN Initiative with the Apollo program and the human genome project. But Insel stressed there is no clear timetable for the research. The initiative leaders also emphasized the importance of collaboration, and groups funded by the project will be expected to share their technologies and findings with each other and the public. Government and private organizations have pledged a total of $232 million to get the project off the ground. DARPA will contribute $50 million, the NIH will contribute $40 million and the NSF will contribute $20 million for the fiscal year 2014. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Kavli Foundation and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies will contribute the remaining $122 million, some of which will become an annual contribution. The initiative has garnered both praise and criticism. Many believe it is a vital opportunity to raise the profile of neuroscience. Some worry it will draw too much funding away from other important research, while others say it doesn’t have enough funding to accomplish the goals already set out. The initiative’s leaders said the initial funding is meant to be symbolic, designed to attract attention rather than provide comprehensive funding for its ambitious goals.Roadmap for the future The NIH request for applications (RFA) will be out within a month, Insel said. The NSF, too, will be calling for applications soon. DARPA’s deputy director of the Defense Sciences Office, Geoffrey Ling, expressed the agency’s steadfast support of the initiative. "All of us want to cure Alzheimer’s disease, all of us want to cure multiple sclerosis, all of us want to cure traumatic brain injury," said Ling, who is a neurologist, adding, "We have not yet. The timing is right to take it to the next level." The defense agency has two main priorities for its involvement: developing better diagnostics and treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders, and restoring memory. After Obama announced the initiative in April, the NIH put together a working group to discuss timetables, milestones and costs of the research. The group released an interim report on Sept. 16, and plans to release a final report in June 2014. Europe has embarked on its own brain initiative, a $1.3 billion (1 billion euros) project known as the Human Brain Project. Directed by the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, in Switzerland, with funding from the European Union, the 10-year project aims to build a computer model of the human brain. Insel expressed optimism for the future of concerted efforts to understand the brain. "It’s beginning to feel like a global movement," he said.
Source: MNN

sagansense:

Momentum Builds For Obama’s BRAIN Initiative

One of the goals of this collaboration of public and private funds is to better understand the brain’s structure and function.

A new initiative to understand the human brain, announced by President Barack Obama earlier this year, has left people wondering exactly what its goals will be. The project’s leaders sketched out their ideas — and offered a healthy dose of enthusiasm — at a recent meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego.

The BRAIN Initiative (short for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) is a collaborative effort between government agencies, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and private funding organizations.

The ambitious project — the details of which are still being worked out — aims to speed development of new technologies for understanding the brain’s structure and function.

The ‘next great American project’
Obama has called the BRAIN Initiative "the next great American project," and indeed, that was the mood among the panel members here. Thomas Insel, director of the NIH’s National Institute of Mental Health, compared the BRAIN Initiative with the Apollo program and the human genome project. But Insel stressed there is no clear timetable for the research.

The initiative leaders also emphasized the importance of collaboration, and groups funded by the project will be expected to share their technologies and findings with each other and the public.

Government and private organizations have pledged a total of $232 million to get the project off the ground. DARPA will contribute $50 million, the NIH will contribute $40 million and the NSF will contribute $20 million for the fiscal year 2014. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Kavli Foundation and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies will contribute the remaining $122 million, some of which will become an annual contribution.

The initiative has garnered both praise and criticism. Many believe it is a vital opportunity to raise the profile of neuroscience. Some worry it will draw too much funding away from other important research, while others say it doesn’t have enough funding to accomplish the goals already set out.

The initiative’s leaders said the initial funding is meant to be symbolic, designed to attract attention rather than provide comprehensive funding for its ambitious goals.

Roadmap for the future
The NIH request for applications (RFA) will be out within a month, Insel said. The NSF, too, will be calling for applications soon.

DARPA’s deputy director of the Defense Sciences Office, Geoffrey Ling, expressed the agency’s steadfast support of the initiative. "All of us want to cure Alzheimer’s disease, all of us want to cure multiple sclerosis, all of us want to cure traumatic brain injury," said Ling, who is a neurologist, adding, "We have not yet. The timing is right to take it to the next level."

The defense agency has two main priorities for its involvement: developing better diagnostics and treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders, and restoring memory.

After Obama announced the initiative in April, the NIH put together a working group to discuss timetables, milestones and costs of the research. The group released an interim report on Sept. 16, and plans to release a final report in June 2014.

Europe has embarked on its own brain initiative, a $1.3 billion (1 billion euros) project known as the Human Brain Project. Directed by the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, in Switzerland, with funding from the European Union, the 10-year project aims to build a computer model of the human brain.

Insel expressed optimism for the future of concerted efforts to understand the brain. "It’s beginning to feel like a global movement," he said.

Source: MNN

(Source: mothernaturenetwork)

— 10 months ago with 113 notes

thighabetic:

The American political system in action

(Source: welcometospringfield, via comedyforthosewhothink)

— 12 months ago with 28478 notes
"I actually attack the concept of happiness. The idea that - I don’t mind people being happy - but the idea that everything we do is part of the pursuit of happiness seems to me a really dangerous idea and has led to a contemporary disease in Western society, which is fear of sadness. It’s a really odd thing that we’re now seeing people saying “write down 3 things that made you happy today before you go to sleep”, and “cheer up” and “happiness is our birthright” and so on. We’re kind of teaching our kids that happiness is the default position - it’s rubbish. Wholeness is what we ought to be striving for and part of that is sadness, disappointment, frustration, failure; all of those things which make us who we are. Happiness and victory and fulfillment are nice little things that also happen to us, but they don’t teach us much. Everyone says we grow through pain and then as soon as they experience pain they say “Quick! Move on! Cheer up!” I’d like just for a year to have a moratorium on the word “happiness” and to replace it with the word “wholeness”. Ask yourself “is this contributing to my wholeness?” and if you’re having a bad day, it is."

Hugh Mackay

(via reservingheartbeats)

This is quote could change someone’s life.

(via ashanti-notthesinger)

Wholeness. Yes.

(via missturman)

If you only see one post on my blog, let it be this one.

(via recovery—minded)

(Source: black-wolves, via socialjusticejonah)

— 1 year ago with 58572 notes
"

When government officials came to Silicon Valley to demand easier ways for the world’s largest Internet companies to turn over user data as part of a secret surveillance program, the companies bristled. In the end, though, many cooperated at least a bit.

Twitter declined to make it easier for the government. But other companies were more compliant, according to people briefed on the negotiations. They opened discussions with national security officials about developing technical methods to more efficiently and securely share the personal data of foreign users in response to lawful government requests. And in some cases, they changed their computer systems to do so.

The negotiations shed a light on how Internet companies, increasingly at the center of people’s personal lives, interact with the spy agencies that look to their vast trove of information — e-mails, videos, online chats, photos and search queries — for intelligence. They illustrate how intricately the government and tech companies work together, and the depth of their behind-the-scenes transactions.

The companies that negotiated with the government include Google, which owns YouTube; Microsoft, which owns Hotmail and Skype; Yahoo; Facebook; AOL; Apple; and Paltalk, according to one of the people briefed on the discussions. The companies were legally required to share the data under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. People briefed on the discussions spoke on the condition of anonymity because they are prohibited by law from discussing the content of FISA requests or even acknowledging their existence.

In at least two cases, at Google and Facebook, one of the plans discussed was to build separate, secure portals, like a digital version of the secure physical rooms that have long existed for classified information, in some instances on company servers. Through these online rooms, the government would request data, companies would deposit it and the government would retrieve it, people briefed on the discussions said.

… Each of the nine companies said it had no knowledge of a government program providing officials with access to its servers, and drew a bright line between giving the government wholesale access to its servers to collect user data and giving them specific data in response to individual court orders. Each said it did not provide the government with full, indiscriminate access to its servers.

The companies said they do, however, comply with individual court orders, including under FISA. The negotiations, and the technical systems for sharing data with the government, fit in that category because they involve access to data under individual FISA requests. And in some cases, the data is transmitted to the government electronically, using a company’s servers.

“The U.S. government does not have direct access or a ‘back door’ to the information stored in our data centers,” Google’s chief executive, Larry Page, and its chief legal officer, David Drummond, said in a statement on Friday. “We provide user data to governments only in accordance with the law.”

Statements from Microsoft, Yahoo, Facebook, Apple, AOL and Paltalk made the same distinction.

But instead of adding a back door to their servers, the companies were essentially asked to erect a locked mailbox and give the government the key, people briefed on the negotiations said. Facebook, for instance, built such a system for requesting and sharing the information, they said.

The data shared in these ways, the people said, is shared after company lawyers have reviewed the FISA request according to company practice. It is not sent automatically or in bulk, and the government does not have full access to company servers. Instead, they said, it is a more secure and efficient way to hand over the data.

Tech companies might have also denied knowledge of the full scope of cooperation with national security officials because employees whose job it is to comply with FISA requests are not allowed to discuss the details even with others at the company, and in some cases have national security clearance, according to both a former senior government official and a lawyer representing a technology company.

"

The New York Times, “Tech Companies Concede to Surveillance Program.”

They should just rename the Internet “Everyone’s All Up In Ur Shit.”

(via inothernews)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

— 1 year ago with 361 notes
fylatinamericanhistory:

Deposed Mexican president Porfirio Díaz and his family pose in front of the Great Sphinx of Giza, 1913.

fylatinamericanhistory:

Deposed Mexican president Porfirio Díaz and his family pose in front of the Great Sphinx of Giza, 1913.

(via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

— 1 year ago with 797 notes
fylatinamericanhistory:


U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, right, talks with Brazil’s Vice President Michel Temer during a photo opportunity at the Itamaraty palace in Brasilia, Friday, May 31, 2013. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

Looks like they just fell in love…

fylatinamericanhistory:

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, right, talks with Brazil’s Vice President Michel Temer during a photo opportunity at the Itamaraty palace in Brasilia, Friday, May 31, 2013. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

Looks like they just fell in love…

— 1 year ago with 41 notes

The amount of work put into a joke like this, is so incredibly admirable to me.

(via brain-food)

— 1 year ago with 83344 notes

randomness-is-epic:

did you know that you can make people laugh without insulting anyone

(via marilynmonrow)

— 1 year ago with 376 notes